Massage and Rubbing

Massage

People have always instinctively rubbed sore muscles and other painful areas to ease their pain and to help the sore muscle recover more quickly. Long ago it was found that this kind of rubbing can also cure a number of disorders such as headaches, joint pain, and an uneasy stomach, and that simple rubbing can even strengthen weakened organs.

The therapeutic effects of massage are known world-wide. The Japanese have used acupressure, which is derived from Chinese massage, for centuries. The Greek upper classes have used a form of massage—slapping the skin with switches—to cure various disorders. However, the Chinese have fully systematized massage to agree with the theory of Qi circulation.

There are three general Chinese massage treatments. The first is massaging the muscle; the second, massaging the cavities, or acupuncture points; and the third, massaging the nerve and channel endings. Each category of massage has its own specific uses, but generally a mixture of the three is used.

Muscle massage is used to relieve soreness and bruises. The masseuse follows the direction of the muscle fiber using rubbing, pressing, sliding, grasping, slapping, and shaking techniques. The result is an increase in the circulation of blood and Qi on the skin and in the muscle area. It also helps to spread accumulated acid, which collects in the muscles due to hard exercise, or blood (in the case of bruises), or stagnant Qi, allowing the circulation to disperse them more quickly. Commonly this type of massage is also used to help a person overcome a feeling of weakness or tiredness.

The second category is massaging the acupuncture points. These same points are used in Japanese acupressure, with the addition of a few other points. The principle of massaging the acupuncture points is the same as in acupuncture theory: to stimulate the channels by stimulating cavities that can be reached easily by rubbing or pressing with the hands, rather than needles. In acupressure, some non-channel points are used to stimulate minor Qi channels to help circulate energy locally. Figures 4-7 through 4-12 show the common acupuncture points used in massage.

The third category of massage is to rub or press the endings of the nerves and Qi channels. These channels are located on the hands (Figure 4-13), feet (Figure 4-14), and ears (Figure 4-5). You can easily rub the zones that correspond to the different organs, or that are effective for specific symptoms or illnesses. This form of massage is known in the West as reflexology. Theoretically, if the channel endings are rubbed, the Qi will be stimulated to a higher level, which increases the circulation and benefits the related organ or cures the illness. If you are interested in knowing more about massage, please refer to the book: Chinese Qigong Massage, available from YMAA Publication Center.

Baihui

Baihui

Baihui PointAcupuncture Points Around The Neck
Figure 4-8. Acupuncture Points on the Neck Used for Massage

Shanzhong

Qimen

Shanzhong

Qimen

Baihui Cavity
Figure 4-9. Acupuncture Points on the Front Used for Massage
Bladder Acupuncture Point

Fengmen

Feishu

Gaohuangshu

Shenzhu

Geshu

Sanjiaoshu

Zhishi

Shenshu

Ganshu

Pishu

Mingmen Dachangshu Ciliao

Fengmen

Feishu

Gaohuangshu

Shenzhu

Geshu

Ganshu

Pishu

Sanjiaoshu

Zhishi

Shenshu

Mingmen Dachangshu Ciliao

Figure 4-10. Acupuncture Points on the Back Used for Massage

DachangshuAcupuncture Points Arm
Figure 4-11. Acupuncture Points on the Arms Used for Massage
Point Acupuncture ThymusReflexology Transverse Zone Maps

LEFT BIGHT

Figure 4-13. Massaging Zones in Hands Reflexology

Foot Reflexology Thymus

Figure 4-14. Massaging Zones in Feet Reflexology

Right

16. Ear

17. Eve ia Liver ia Bladder 2Q Adrenal 21 Appendix 22. Pancreas

2a Sciatic Nerve 24 Rectum 2& Small Intestine 2a Heart 27. Sinuses 2a Bronchial

29. Spleen

30. Thymus

Right

Nerves The Colon

Pineal Throat Thyroid Pituitary Stomach Hip and Knee Gall Bladder Lungs Kidney

Sigmoid Colon Transverse Colon Descending Colon Ascending Colon Shoulder Solar Plexus

Solar Plexus Exercises
Figure 4-16

Hand Forms and Common Methods Used in Massage.

1. Knuckles: single, double, and four fingers for circular rubbing and pressing (Figures 4-15 to 4-17).

2. The side of the fist for circular rubbing (Figure 4-18).

3. Fingertips for tapping and circular rubbing (Figure 4-19).

Figure 4-1 7
Palm Rubbing
Figure 4-18
Pineal Meditation Exercises
Figure 4-20
Figure 4-21

Hand Forms and Common Methods Used in Massage—Continued

4. The root of the palm (base of the thumb) for circular and straight rubbing and pressing (Figures 4-20 and 4-21).

5. The base of the fingers for circular and straight rubbing and pressing (Figures 4-22 and 4-23).

6. The side of the palm for pressing and rubbing (Figure 4-24).

Palm RubbingQigong Hand Exercises
Figure 4-26

Hand Forms and Common Methods Used in Massage—Continued

7. The elbow for circular rubbing and pressing (Figure 4-25).

8. Fingers for grasping muscles (Figures 4-26 to 4-28).

9. Pinching or grasping the skin and shaking (Figure 4-29).

Massage Shaking

Figure 4-27

Figure 4-28

Figure 4-27

Figure 4-28

Base Finger Pain PalmMeditation Figure
Figure 4-30
Figure 4-31

Hand Forms and Common Methods Used in Massage—Continued 10. Slapping with the backs or the sides of the hands (Figures 4-30 and 4-31).

Rubbing

Very often, when you have an injury such as a bruise or strained joint, you will automatically rub the injured area. This rubbing reduces pain and eases the nerves and muscles. Theoretically, this kind of rubbing causes the Qi to circulate, which in turn prevents Qi stagnation in that area.

In Qigong, rubbing or friction is used to increase heat or Qi on the skin, which increases the energy potential there, and causes Qi to circulate deeper into the body. Rubbing your face correctly can help keep the skin looking youthful by keeping it well nourished with the flow of Qi and blood. As was mentioned earlier, some parts of the body such as the palm (Figure 4-13) and the sole of the foot (Figure 4-14) have channels ending there, and rubbing these channel endings will increase the energy flow in the channels and benefit the corresponding organs. A good example of this is that rubbing the palms together briskly in cold weather will not just keep the arms and hands warm, but the internal organs as well. This is different from massaging the channel zones, which was described in the previous section.

Rubbing the skin over some of the organs will increase the function of the organs through the increased local energy flow caused by the rubbing. For example, rubbing the stomach will lessen pain and increase digestion. Rubbing will also relax the nerves in the area. The same principle holds true for the kidneys.

The large joints of the body—shoulders, elbows, wrists, knees, and ankles— are easily injured by over-exercise or excessive stress on the ligaments. When such injuries do not heal completely, arthritis commonly results. Rubbing the joint area will relax the joint area while stimulating energy circulation, which helps the injured area to heal. In addition, rubbing may even help to cure arthritis after it has set in. For more information on treating arthritis with Qigong, please refer to the book Arthritis—The Chinese Way of Healing <§ Prevention, available from YMAA Publication Center.

Chinese Qigong Figures

Figure 4-32

Figure 4-33

Figure 4-32

Figure 4-33

Rubbing methods appropriate to each area of the body.

1. Face: Lightly rub the eyelids and eye sockets with the fingertips in a circular motion. Rub the cheeks with light strokes of the fingertips from the nose outward to the sides of the face (Figure 4-32).

2. Stomach: Use a circular motion to harmonize with the curve of the intestines (Figures 4-33 and 4-34).

3. Feet: Rub and press the zones shown in Figure 4-14 (Figure 4-35).

4. Hands: Rub and press the zones shown in Figure 4-13 (Figure 4-36).

Where Rub Feet Stimulate Bowel

Figure 4-34

Figure 4-34

Figure 4-35
Figure 4-38

Rubbing methods appropriate to each area of the body—Continued

5. Kidneys: Rub with a circular motion using the sides of the palm (Figure 4-37).

6. Wrists: For joint rubbing, the main purpose is to warm the joint, not to stimulate the muscles. Rub the wrist by stroking it along the direction of the arm and in a circular motion around the joint (Figure 4-38).

7. Elbows: Rub lightly both up and down the arms and around the arms (Figures 4-39 and 4-40).

8. Shoulders: Rub lightly both up and down the arms and in a circular motion (Figure 4-41).

Wrist Exercise Figure Eight

Figure 4-39

Rubbing The Perineum

Figure 4-40

Figure 4-39

Figure 4-40

MilPP

Figure 4-42

Rubbing methods appropriate to each area of the body—Continued 9. Knees: Rub lightly both up and down the legs and in a circular motion. 10. Ankles: Rub lightly both up and down the legs and around the joints. Also rub and press the zones shown in Figure 4-14 (Figure 4-42).

Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Qigong also spelled Ch'i Kung is a potent system of healing and energy medicine from China. It's the art and science of utilizing breathing methods, gentle movement, and meditation to clean, fortify, and circulate the life energy qi.

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Responses

  • chris
    Does rubbing sore muscles help?
    7 years ago
  • Bianca
    Is acu points massage and meditation the benefit to improve health the same?
    7 years ago
  • silvana
    Is it true that rubbing of four figures?
    7 years ago
  • PROSERPIO
    What hand method is used when massaging?
    7 years ago
  • aleksi
    What is the innervation of the sigmoid colon?
    7 years ago
  • ILARIA
    What is used to connect the sigmoid back to the rectum?
    6 years ago
  • Samuel
    How to meditation of power in chinese massage?
    5 years ago
  • PATRIZIO CALABRESE
    How to massage face figures?
    2 years ago

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