About the Author

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming was born on August 11th, 1946, in Xinzhu Xian (*##), Taiwan (6 3»), Republic of China ( + ¥K.S). He started his Wushu (A#Q(Gongfu or Kung Fu, $k ) training at the age of fifteen under the Shaolin White Crane (Bai He, Master Cheng, Gin-Gsao (**»).

Master Cheng originally learned Taizuquan (£.#.#-) from his grandfather when he was a child. When Master Cheng was fifteen years old, he started learning White Crane from Master Jin, Shao-Feng ( & ), and followed him for twenty-three years until Master Jin's death.

In thirteen years of study (1961-1974 A.D.) under Master Cheng, Dr. Yang became an expert in the White Crane Style of Chinese martial arts, which includes both the use of barehands and of various weapons such as saber, staff, spear, trident, two short rods, and many other weapons. With the same master he also studied White Crane Qigong (ILii), Qin Na (or Chin Na, tt t), Tui Na (■ffit") and Dian Xue massages and herbal treatment.

At the age of sixteen, Dr, Yang began the study of Yang Style Taijiquan under Master Kao Tao ( ft # ), After learning from Master Kao, Dr. Yang continued his study and research of Taijiquan with several masters and senior practitioners such as Master Li, Mao-Ching (*3U) and Mr. Wilson Chen in Taipei (6Jt).

Master Li learned his Taijiquan from the well-known Master Han, Ching-Tang (it A £ ), and Mr. Chen learned his Taijiquan from Master Chang, Xiang-San (). Dr. Yang has mastered the Taiji barehand sequence, pushing hands, the two-man fighting sequence, Taiji sword, Taiji saber, and Taiji Qigong.

When Dr. Yang was eighteen years old he entered Tamkang College (¡fc^ft) in Taipei Xian to study Physics. In college he began the study of traditional Shaolin Long Fist (Changquan or Chang Chuan, with Master Li, Mao-Ching at the

Tamkang College Guoshu Club (¿*^0#iii)(1964-1968 A.D.), and eventually became an assistant instructor under Master Li. in 1971 he completed his M.S. degree in Physics at the National Taiwan University ( 6 i* k $ ), and then served in the Chinese Air Force from 1971 to 1972. In the service, Dr. Yang taught Physics at the Junior Academy of the Chinese Air Force (S^ftttt) while also teaching Wushu. After being honorably discharged in 1972, he returned to Tamkang College to teach Physics and resumed study under Master Li, Mao-Ching. From Master Li, Dr. Yang learned Northern Style Wushu, which includes both barehand (especially kicking) techniques and numerous weapons.

In 1974, Dr. Yang came to the United States to study Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University. At the request of a few students, Dr. Yang began to teach Gongfu (Kung Fu), which resulted in the foundation of the Purdue University Chinese Kung Fu Research Club in the spring of 1975. While at Purdue, Dr. Yang also taught college-credited courses in Taijiquan, In May of 1978 he was awarded a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering by Purdue.

In 1980, Dr. Yang moved to Houston to work for Texas Instruments. While in Houston he founded Yang's Shaolin Kung Fu Academy, which was eventually taken over by his disciple Mr. Jeffery Bolt after he moved to Boston in 1982. Dr. Yang founded Yang's Martial Arts Academy (YMAA) in Boston on October 1, 1982.

In January of 1984 he gave up his engineering career to devote more time to research, writing, and teaching. In March of 1986 he purchased property in the Jamaica Plain area of Boston to be used as the headquarters of the new organization, Yang's Martial Arts Association. The organization has continued to expand, and, as of July 1st 1989, YMAA has become just one division of Yang's Oriental Arts Association, Inc. (YOAA, Inc).

In summary, Dr. Yang has been involved in Chinese Wushu since 1961. During this time, he has spent thirteen years learning Shaolin White Crane (Bai He), Shaolin Long Fist (Changquan), and Taijiquan. Dr. Yang has more than twenty-eight years of instructional experience: seven years in Taiwan, five years at Purdue University, two years in Houston, Texas, and fourteen years in Boston, Massachusetts.

In addition, Dr. Yang has also been invited to offer seminars around the world to share his knowledge of Chinese martial arts and Qigong. The countries he has visited include Canada, Mexico, France, Italy, Poland, England, Ireland, Portugal, Switzerland, Germany, Hungary, Spain, Holland, Latvia, South Africa, and Saudi Arabia.

Since 1986, YMAA has become an international organization, which currently includes 30 schools located in Poland, Portugal, France, Italy, Holland, Hungary, South Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States. Many of Dr. Yang's books and videotapes have been translated into languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, Polish, Czech, Bulgarian, and Hungarian.

Dr. Yang has published twenty-two other volumes on the martial arts and Qigong:

1. Shaolin Chin Na; Unique Publications, Inc., 1980.

2. Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu; Unique Publications, Inc., 1981.

3. Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan; Unique Publications, Inc., 1981.

4. Introduction to Ancient Chinese Weapons; Unique Publications, Inc., 1985.

5. Chi Kung—Health and Martial Arts; YMAA Publication Center, 1985.

6. Northern Shaolin Sword; YMAA Publication Center, 1985.

7. Tai Chi Theory and Martial Power; YMAA Publication Center, 1986.

8. Tai Chi Chuan Martial Applications; YMAA Publication Center, 1986.

9. Analysis ofShaolin Chin Na; YMAA Publication Center, 1987.

10. Eight Simple Qigong Exercises for Health; YMAA Publication Center, 1988.

11. The Root of Chinese Qigong—Secrets for Health, Longevity, and

Enlightenment; YMAA Publication Center, 1989.

12. Muscle/Tendon Changing and Marrow/Brain Washing Chi Kung—

The Secret of Youth; YMAA Publication Center, 1989.

13. Hsing Yi Chuan—Theory and Applications; YMAA Publication Center,

1990.

14. The Essence of Tai Chi Chi Kung—Health and Martial Arts;

YMAA Publication Center, 1990.

15. Arthritis—The Chinese Way of Healing and Prevention; YMAA

Publication Center, 1991.

16. Chinese Qigong Massage—General Massage; YMAA Publication Center,

1992.

17. How to Defend Yourself; YMAA Publication Center, 1992.

18. Baguazhang—Emei Baguazhang; YMAA Publication Center, 1994.

19. Comprehensive Applications ofShaolin Chin Na—The Practical

Defense of Chinese Seizing Arts; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

20. Taiji Chin Na—The Seizing Art ofTaijiquan; YMAA Publication Center,

1995.

21. The Essence ofShaolin White Crane; YMAA Publication Center, 1996.

22. Back Pain—Chinese Qigong for Healing & Prevention; YMAA Publication

Center, 1997.

Dr. Yang has also published the following videotapes:

1. Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan and Its Applications; YMAA Publication

Center, 1984.

2. Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu—Lien Bu Chuan and Its Applications;

YMAA Publication Center, 1985.

3. Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu—Gung Li Chuan and Its Applications;

YMAA Publication Center, 1986.

4. Analysis ofShaolin Chin Na; YMAA Publication Center, 1987.

5. Eight Simple Qigong Exercises for Health—The Eight Pieces of Brocade;

YMAA Publication Center, 1987.

Chi Kung for Tai Chi Chuan; YMAA Publication Center, 1990.

Arthritis—The Chinese Way of Healing and Prevention; YMAA Publication Center, 1991.

Qigong Massage—Self Massage; YMAA Publication Center, 1992.

Qigong Massage—With a Partner; YMAA Publication Center, 1992.

Defend Yourself 1—Unarmed Attack; YMAA Publication Center, 1992.

Defend Yourself 2—Knife Attack; YMAA Publication Center, 1992.

Comprehensive Applications of Shaolin Chin Na 1; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Comprehensive Applications of Shaolin Chin Na 2; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu—Yi Lu Mai Fu & Er Lu Mai Fu; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu—Shi Zi Tang; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Taiji Chin Na; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Emei Baguazhang 1—Basic Training, Qigong, Eight Palms, and Applications; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Emei Baguazhang 2—Swimming Body Baguazhang and Its Applications; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Emei Baguazhang 3—Bagua Deer Hook Sword and Its Applications;

YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Xingyiquan—12 Animal Patterns and Their Applications; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Simplified Tai Chi Chuan—Simplified 24 Postures & Standard 48 Postures; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

Tai Chi Chuan & Applications—Simplified 24 Postures with Applications & Standard 48 Postures; YMAA Publication Center, 1995.

White Crane Hard Qigong; YMAA Publication Center, 1997.

White Crane Soft Qigong; YMAA Publication Center, 1997.

Xiao Hu Yan—Intermediate Level Long Fist Sequence; YMAA Publication Center, 1997

Back Pain—Chinese Qigong for Healing and Prevention; YMAA Publication Center, 1997.

The Scientific Foundation of Chinese Qigong; YMAA Publication Center, 1997.

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Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Qigong also spelled Ch'i Kung is a potent system of healing and energy medicine from China. It's the art and science of utilizing breathing methods, gentle movement, and meditation to clean, fortify, and circulate the life energy qi.

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