Moving Tai Chi Chi Kung

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Moving Tai Chi Chi Kung includes both stationary and walking exercises. In this section I will introduce three stationary sets. The first one, which I call the "primary set," is usually used for Tai Chi beginners. I call the second set the "coiling set,' since it emphasizes coiling movements. The third set is the "rocking set." It trains the

Chi Kung Dantien

Figure 3-52. Figure 3-53.

coordination of the hands, feet, and the movement of the body. These three sets actually combine the Tai Chi Chi Kung and the White Crane Chi Kung which I was taught, and they have benefitted not only me but many of my students.

The walking set uses individual movements out of the Tai Chi sequence which are performed repeatedly. The criteria for performing these exercises are exactly the same-as for performing the Tai Chi -86-

Figure 3-52. Figure 3-53.

coordination of the hands, feet, and the movement of the body. These three sets actually combine the Tai Chi Chi Kung and the White Crane Chi Kung which I was taught, and they have benefitted not only me but many of my students.

The walking set uses individual movements out of the Tai Chi sequence which are performed repeatedly. The criteria for performing these exercises are exactly the same-as for performing the Tai Chi -86-

sequence. Since you are doing the same movement over and over again, you do not have to pay so much attention to the form, and can devote all of your attention to regulating your body, breathing, and mind, and to using your Yi to lead your Chi.

Before starting, you should understand that using the proper hand form is another important key to successful training. It is believed that the different hand forms originally came from imitating animals. It was found that holding the hand in the shape of the claw of an eagle, tiger, or crane led the Chi strongly to the hand. The different styles of Tai Chi Chuan have their different ways of forming the hands. It is not surprising that even within the styles some masters use different hand forms, depending upon their personal experience and understanding of Chi. I would like to introduce a hand form which I consider the best for leading Chi to the Laogong cavity in the center of the palm.

In this hand form, which is called "Woa Shoou" (tile hand), the hand is curved like a Chinese roof tile. The thumb and middle finger are stretched forward slightly, and the second and little fingers are pulled back slightly (Figure 3-54). After you hold this hand form for a few minutes you should notice the center of your palm getting warmer and warmer. Use this hand form whenever your palms are open.

Stationary Tai Chi Chi Kung

I. Primary Set

This set of Chi Kung exercises has several purposes: 1. To help the Tai Chi beginner understand and feel Chi. The sooner a beginner is able to understand what Chi is and to feel it, the sooner and more easily he or she can understand the internal energy of the body. This set is simple and very easy to

Figure 3-55.

remember, so after a short time you will be able to do it comfortably and automatically, and devote your concentration to your breathing and Chi.

2. To learn how to lead Chi to the limbs. When you have regulated your body, breathing, and mind, you then learn how to lead Chi from the limbs to the Lower Dan Tien when you inhale, and from the Lower Dan Tien to the limbs when you exhale. This trains you in using your Yi to lead the Chi (Yii Yi Yiin Chi), which is very critical in Tai Chi training.

3. To gradually open up the twelve primary Chi channels. After you have practiced this set for a long time, you will find that the Chi is flowing more and more strongly. This stronger Chi circulation will gradually open the twelve Chi channels, and let the Chi circulate more smoothly in your twelve internal organs. This is the key to maintaining good health.

4. To loosen up the internal muscles, especially those around the internal organs. This loosening removes any Chi stagnation near the internal organs, which lets them relax and receive the proper Chi nourishment.

Forms:

L Stand Still to Regulate the Breathing (Jing Li TVau Shyi)

H&WA

After you have completed your warm-up Chi Kung, stand still and close your eyes (Figure 3-55). First pay attention to your third eye (Upper Dan Tien), and bring all of your thoughts from outside of your body to the inside. When your mind is calm and concentrated, bring your attention to your breathing. If you are doing only relaxation Chi

Reversed Abdominal Breathing
Figure 3-56. Figure 3-57.

Kung training, use Normal Abdominal Breathing, and if you are training for martial arts, use Reverse Abdominal Breathing. It does not matter which breathing technique you use, when you withdraw your abdomen, hold up your Huiyin cavity and anus, and when you expand your abdomen, relax or slightly expand your Huiyin cavity and anus. Remember: DO NOT TENSE OR STRONGLY LIFT UP YOUR HUIYIN CAVITY AND ANUS. This will tense the lower part of your body and stagnate the Chi circulation. After you train this abdominal anus breathing for a period of time, you will feel that when you breathe, the lower part of your body is also breathing with you.

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Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Qigong also spelled Ch'i Kung is a potent system of healing and energy medicine from China. It's the art and science of utilizing breathing methods, gentle movement, and meditation to clean, fortify, and circulate the life energy qi.

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