Exercise

Energygates Feet

Qimen

Fig 2

Qimen

Procedure:

Either sit or stand. If you like to stand, keep the feet apart to shoulder width and close the hands at Dantian. If you sit, sit upright, put the hands in front of the forehead, and keep the body relaxed and the mind quiet. When practising this exercise, execute the movements quickly at first and then slowly, and direct the flow of Qi and blood evenly and silently.

Methods:

This exercise consists of four methods: the method of directing Qi through the liver meridian, the method of sight improvement, the method of directing Qi at fixed points, and the method of directing Qi by pressing the acupoints around the eyes.

a. The method of directing Qi through the liver meridian: This is a method for curing diseases by directing Qi through the liver meridian. Both the posture and points for attention are the same as described above. Close the eyes, relax the body, use the mind to guide the flow of Qi through the liver meridian, starting from the Dadun acupoints (located on the lateral sides of the big toes), along the shanks, the inner sides of the thighs into the abdomen, upward to the Qimen acupoints on the chest, and then through the throat upward to the eyes. Open the eyes, look at a fixed target several metres ahead, and imagine the removal of the stale Qi from inside the eyes. Practise this repeatedly. (Fig. 1)

b. The method of sight improvement: This is a method of directing Qi around the eyes to improve the sight. The posture and points for attention are the same as described above. Close the eyes, relax the body, and concentrate the mind. First close the eyes to look internally then look up and down, to the right, to the left, and ahead. And then look by turning the eyes first from left to right, and then from right to left. Practise this repeatedly. (Figs. 2,3,4)

c. The method of directing Qi at fixed points: This refers to the selection of a certain fixed point for the direction of Qi. The posture and points for attention are the same as described above. Close the eyes, relax the body, and concentrate the mind. Then look at a selected point in the distance several metres away, perhaps a tree or a flowering plant. Open the eyes wide and glare like a tiger. Then close the eyes to look internally. Then open one eye and close the other. Practise repeatedly. (Figs. 5,6)

Fig 1

Fig 4

Fig 3

Dadun d. The method of directing Qi by pressing the meridian points around the eyes: This is a method fordirecting Qi to the fingers and using the mind to point and press the meridian points around the eyes. The posture and points for attention are the same as described above. Close the eyes, relax the body, concentrate the mind and use the mind to guide the flow of Qi to the index and middle fingers to press the meridian points, starting from Baihui, along the Du channel, past the Shenting into Yintang acupoints (the route is Baihui-Shenting-Yintang, Fig. 7). Then, press the acupoints around the eyes, along the route ofYintang-Zanzhu-Yanmei (Yuyao)-Sizhukong, the eye corner (Tongziliao)-Qiuhou-Chengqi-Jianming-Jingming. First press from the bow of the left eyebrow to the bow of the right eyebrow, and then from below the right eye socket to the left eye socket. Press around the circle clockwise and counter clockwise seven times, respectively (Fig. 8) Finally, press from Baihui-Yintang, along the separate routes from the left and right eyebrows around the eyes, pastJingming acupoints downward to the Yingxiang acupoints on the two sides of the nose to join at the Renzhong acupoint. The Qi flows from the chest down to Dantian. Practise this way repeatedly.

Closing form:

Raise both hands slowly upward to shoulder level, bend the elbows, fingers pointing at each other, palms downward. Press them downward lightly on both sides or put the palms togetherand place the right hand ontopofthe left hand (women in the opposite direction) pressing against Dantian in the lower abdomen. Close the eyes for a few seconds to close the form. (Fig. 9)

Mind concentration and breathing:

Fall into quiescence through the adjustment of mental activities, breathe naturally, and close the eyes to maintain normal breathing, smooth the eyebrows and expand the chest. Inhale while opening the eyes, and exhale while closing the eyes. Coordinate mind concentration with breathing while practising this exercise.

Indications:

The exercise is simple and easy to learn. Its effect will be seen after practising it for one or two months. It helps improve the function of the eyes, adjust the cerebral nerve, correct and improve the eyesight of young people, and has a preventive and curative effect for declining sight, myopia, weak sight, astigmatism and farsightedness. It also helps to strengthen the brain, improve fitness, and has a certain effect in relieving headache, neurosis, insomnia and liver diseases.

Effect:

a. Reaction from the sensation of Qi: You may feel warm or relaxed around the eyes when practising the exercise or shed tears at the beginning. Both are normal reactions so do not mind them.

b. Bad reaction: Just reduce the number of times you practising the exercise if you have dim sight or shed tears after doing it for 1 -3 weeks. Avoid exerting too much effort. Breathe slowly. It is a normal phenomenon if you see red, yellow, green, blue, white or purple spots or rings.

Time and Number of repetitions:

Practise once or twice a day, 15-20 minutes each time. Once for each form and 7-21 repetitions each session^

Fig 5 Fig 6

Baihui

Acupressure Baihui The Shen
Yintang
Yintang Acupoint
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