Longevity Exercise Chang Shou Gong

Chang Shou Gong has been popular in the Taihu (Lake Taihu) Region of South China for a long time. It is characterized by integration of mobile and quiescent exercises, convenience for practice both on land or in a boat, providing firmness and gentleness, and all-round positive effects. When it is practised persistently, the diseases may be cured and prolonging of life obtained.

l.Exercise Method

1) The preparatory posture. Calm the mind and concentrate the thoughts, but do not be slack. Let Baihui face the sky. Lower the shoulders and drop elbows. Keep the armpits open, pull in the chest, tense the abdomen, relax the hips, contract the sphincter and bend the knees slightly, standing with the feet a shoulder width apart. Close the mouth and eyes slightly, touch the upper palate with the tip of tongue and breathe naturally. It is generally appropriate to stand in this way for 1 to 5 minutes. This posture is used both at the beginning and end .of the exercise.

2) Looking at the moon from the prow of a boat. Stand with feet a shoulder width apart and arms akimbo. Turn the head at first to the upper right with the eyes looking up the sky, and inhale sufficient air. Then, turn the head downward and exhale slowly (Fig. 14). Repeat the movements in this way 10 to 15 times.

3) Intercepting on the waist. Standing with feet a shoulder width apart. Put both hands on the back, with the centre of the back of one hand pressing lightly and accurately on the Shenshu of the same side and the palm of other hand covering accurately the Shenshu point of the other side, and rubbing it upward and downward 30 to 50 rounds. Then rub the opposite side with the palm of that side (Fig. 15). Repeat the movements, alternating 2 to 4 times.

4) Pushing the boat along with the current. Standing with feet a little wider than a shoulder width apart. Put the left hand on the side of the waist and push the right palm to the upper right until the arm is stretched straight. At the same time turn the head to the left with the eyes looking forward and inhale. After that, return to the original position and exhale. Then, do the same movements with the opposite hand (Fig. 16-1). Repeat, alternating 10 to 20 times.

5) Pushing the waves back and forth. Standing in the bow stance with the right leg at the front, push the right arm forward with the palm facing the front while drawing the left arm backward with its palm facing the back, and inhale. Then change the position of both arms and do the same movements, exhaling when changing. Repeat this 10 to 15 times. Then change the position of the legs and do the same movements. Repeat with alternated legs 2 to 4 times (Fig. 16-2).

Change Pictures Drawing

6) One-armed general. Stand with feet separated by a little more than a shoulder width. Put the left hand on the side of the waist and stretch straight the right arm to the right horizontally. Make circles with 12 cm in diametre with the right arm, taking the shoulder joint as the axis. Breathe once for each circle. Rotate clockwise and counterclockwise, ten circles each. Then change the position of the arms. Repeat the movements with alternated arms 4 to 6 times.

7) Wave upon waves. Stand with feet separated by a little more than a shoulder width. Extend both arms to the sides horizontally, inhaling at the same time. Then push the arms down the front to the knees, bending the upper part of the body. Touch the hollow of the knee with little fingers (Fig. 17), exhaling at the same time. After exhaling, stand straight with the chest throwing out. Extend both arms to the sides horizontally and look at the sky, inhaling at the same time. Repeat the

8) Seething waters up and down. Stand with feet a little wider than a shoulder width apart. Clench both hands loosely and lift them up, but not beyond the level of the ear. Simultaneously rotate the arms forward defining circles 15 cm in diametre. Breathe once for one circle. Inhale during rotating upward while exhale during down ward movement. Repeat in this way altogether 15 to 25 times.

9) Adventuring in the bottom of a lake. Stand as if riding a horse. Clench the right hand and lift it up to the side of the ear, the arm at the same level as the shoulder. Bend the right knee and lift it up. Push the left fist downward to the right and breathe in sufficient air. Exhale when changing the position of the arms. Repeat these movements with alternated arms 10 to 15 times, generally doing it no

10) Rocking in the centre of a lake. Stand with the feet a little wider than shoulder width apart. Extend both arms horizontally with the palms facing down. Swing the arms alternatively up and down as though a small boat were tossing about on the water. Turn the palm up when the arm is swinging upward and turn it down when the arm is swinging downward. Inhale until one arm reaches the maximal height and exhale as it swings down. Repeat these swinging movements

11) Lifting a weight of a thousand jin vigorously. Stand with the feet apart more than a shoulder width. Place the hands in loose fists on the waist. Lift the right elbow as close as possible to the height of the ear, with the right palm facing

Taijiquan Taichichuan

backward. Then lift it higher with strength and at the same time throw out the chest, tense the belly and inhale twice vigourously with sound (Fig. 18). Exhale when lowering the right elbow to the same height as that of the left one. Change the position of the arms and do the same movements. Repeat 15 to 25 times.

12) Going forward by cleaving the waves. Stand with feet a shoulder width apart. Clench both hands and, with the palms facing down, put the fists on the sides of the waist. With the right leg step forward about half a pace, bend the upper part of the body backward slightly. Extend both fists forward horizontally and lean the upper part of the body forward. Throw out the chest, inhale, bend the front leg slightly and stretch the back leg straight. Restore the former position. Then stretch the front leg straight while bending the back leg slightly and exhaling. Repeat these back and forth movements 10 to 20 times. After that, change to the

13) Tiger's back and bear's waist. Stand with the feet apart slightly more than a shoulder width. Alternating, touch the back and the waist; the hands should reach the level of the first thoracic vertebra. Throw out the chest and inhale when the right hand is touching the back. Exhale when changing hands. Repeat 15 to 20 times, at a rate of not more than 10 times a minute.

14) Bending legs and moving knees. Stand with the feet apart at a shoulder width. Bend the hips, knees and ankles, covering the knees with both palms. Rotate the palms both clockwise and counterclockwise 15 times each. After that, restore

15) Dispelling the waves at left and right sides. Stand with the feet a little wider than a shoulder width apart. Put both palms in front of the chest with their centres facing each other and the fingers pointing up. Push the right hand to the right side as though dispelling the waves, with the palm facing the right until the right arm is stretched horizontal, inhaling at the same time. Restore the right hand to its former place while exhaling. Then do the expelling movement with the left hand to the left side. Repeat this way 15 to 25 times. Essentials: the eyes should be look

16) A dolphin leaping out of water. Stand with the feet apart wider of the shoulders. Let the arms hang naturally at your sides. Begin the exercise by rotating both arms simultaneously to the back, then upward, inhaling at the same time. Jump up once or raise the heel up once when the hands reach their highest point. After that, rotate both arms simultaneously forward, then downward and exhale. Repeat the arms-rotating movements 10 to 15 times.

17) Attacking one side suddenly. Stand with the feet wider than a shoulder width. Hold the left hand akimbo and stretch the right palm and lift it to its highest position. Turn the waist to the left, vibrate the hand twice and inhale twice. After that, bring down the right hand to its former position while exhaling. Change to the left hand and do the same. Repeat this routine 10 to 15 times.

Swimming Dragon Gong

18) The prancing of a dragon and leaping of a tiger. Stand with the feet apart a little more than a shoulder width. Bend the knees slightly. Extend both arms to the sides of the body horizontally. Touch the right knee with the left hand, then the left knee with right hand, moving along a wheel-like line (Fig. 19). Breathe once during the rotation. Repeat in this way 10 to 15 times.

19) Fishing out a pearl from the bottom of sea. Stand with the feet a shoulder width apart. Lift the right foot 10 cm above the ground and let it make 5-cm circles, then put it down. Breathe once for each circle. Rotate 6 to 8 times. Do the same with the left foot. Repeat the routine 4 to 10 times.

20) Turning round the heaven and earth. Stand with the feet apart wider than a shoulder width. Put the left hand on the middle part of the waist, bend the knees, and rotate the right hand beginning from the middle Dantian (the pectoral region) clockwise upward to the level of the lower jaw then downward to above the knees. Breathe once for each circle. After rotating 10 to 15 circles, change to the left hand to do the same. Repeat this routine 4 to 6 times.

21) Mutual helping at the back. Stand with the feet apart wider than a shoulder width. Throw out the chest and tense the abdomen. Breathing naturally, clasp one hand with the other on the back of the lumbar vertebra. Pull the hands to the right, then to the left as much as possible. Pull about 15 to 20 times. After that change the position of the hands and do the pull movements another 15 to 20 times. Repeat

22) Expelling waves and kicking water. Stand with the feet apart wider than a shoulder width. Push both hands backward to the left as though expelling water, at the same time turning the waist, kicking out the right leg (Fig. 20), and inhaling. Restore the former position and exhale. Repeat the movements with alternative

23) Luring the dragon out of the water. Stand with the feet apart wider than a shoulder width. Swing the right arm in circular motion. Inhale when the right hand reaches the maximal height and exhale when it is falling down, swinging 10 to 15 times. Then change to the left arm in the same routine. Repeat 4 to 6 times.

24) Mutual help between firmness and gentleness. Stand with the feet apart wider than a shoulder width. With both hands akimbo, rotate the hips, turning and swivelling. Lift up the qi and contract the sphincter. Rotate clockwise first for 10 to 15 rounds, then counterclockwise for another 10 to 15 rounds. Breathe once for

25) Seizing the laurel. Stand with the feet apart at a distance less than a shoulder width. Clench the hands loosely, lifting them up and inhaling. Vibrate them twice when they reach the maximal height and inhale twice. Then bring down both hands while exhaling. Exercise 10 to 20 times.

26) Ba Wang, the conqueror, making his appearance. Stand with the feet a shoulder width apart. Droop the left hand down. Make the right hand clenched lossely and lift it up from the front to the height of the eyes and turn the palm suddenly forward, lifting the left leg and inhaling at the same time. Then restore the former position and exhale. Change to the left hand and the right leg to do the

27) Crane hovering in the air. Stand with the feet a little wider than a shoulder width apart. Extend both arms to the sides horizontally, squat down and stand up alternatively, and flap both arms like a crane flapping its wings in flight. Bending down and standing should be the main movements, arms moving passively. Breathe once for each "flap." Repeat the movements 10 to 20 times.

28) Making a stormy sea stormier. Stand with the feet apart a little wider than a shoulder width. Retract both hands in front of the shoulders with the palms facing forward (Fig. 21). Rotate the arms from the upper side downward laterally. Breathe once for each circle. Repeat the movements 10 to 20 times.

29) Raising hands high into the sky. Stand with the feet a shoulder width apart. Clench both hands loosely, putting the left one on the back of the waist while lifting the right one up to a level slightly above the head, with the palm facing

Zhan Zhuang Allround Stance

forward. Throw out the chest and tense the abdomen, inhaling at the same time. Then lower the right fist and put it on the back of the waist while exhaling. After that, change to the left hand to do the same movements. Repeat 10 to 20 times, at

30) Fishing out the moon from the lake. Stand with the feet greater than a shoulder width apart. Squat down a little with left hand akimbo. Make the right hand a spoon-like form with the palm facing up and rotate it from the lateral upper side downward to the inner side, passing the knee. Thus a large circle is made as though "fishing out" the moon (Fig. 22). Then stand up and inhale. Exhale while squatting again. Repeat 10 to 15 times. After that, do these movements with the left hand. Exercise alternating hands in this way 4 to 6 times.

31) Tranquil inside while mobile outside. Stand with the feet a shoulder width apart. Press the left hand on the side of the hip, clench the right hand loosely and lift it up to the height slightly above the head with its palm facing the front. Then, vibrate the right hand backward two times and inhale twice vigourously with sound. Lower the right hand and exhale at the same time. After that, change to the left hand to do the same movements. Repeat 10 to 15 times. It is'appropriate

Shuai Shou Gong

to do ten times a minute.

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How to Stay Young

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