What Is Feng Shui

Feng shui is a practical form of geomancy used in daily life in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Okinawa (Japan's southern most island) even today. "Feng" means wind, and "shui" water in Chinese. It is a system of thought combined by the physiognomy of a house and a grave, the aspect of a piece of land as an environmental assessment, a theory of location like a city plan, gardens, and a theory of movement that suggests placement of furniture, where indoor plants should be placed, where the bathroom should be, and so on. After qi is judged by visible phenomena like wind, water, streets, etc., living space is rearranged so that positive qi ensues.

According to feng shui, there are three basic elements: mountains, water or rivers, and direction. The wind controls weather and climate, while water is a symbol of the earth that receives wind or qi from heaven. Wind is thought to be the master, and water the follower. While some places have strong vital energy, other places have weak energy. The ancients studied natural phenomena to improve their living conditions. You might have a brief idea by now that feng shui is a technique of understanding qi of the environment. In feng shui theory, a mountain is comparable to a dragon, and so a dragon range indicates a mountain range. Vital qi rises on the summit and flows down to a plain along ranges. Dragons jumping up and down are considered to be full of vibrant energy, while flat dragons have little to offer. A stony mountain without soil, a range that is cut off, and a mountain with no grass or trees are all called dead dragons. Figure 18-1 shows an ideal configuration. The right and left ridgelines in black from Mount Zu-Zong are the dragon ranges. The most vital energy gathers in "Bright Hall," which is equal to an acupuncture point by the navel of a human body. The resident there can enjoy the benevolent influence.

Mount Zu-Zong

Inner range Mount An River-

Mount Zu-Zong

Bright Hall

Outer range

Mount Chao

Bright Hall

Outer range

Figure 18-1

Ideal feng shui map.

Mount Chao

Why do the dragon ranges produce vital power and gather at one point? As far as I know, there is no document available at this point in time that can satisfactorily answer this question. But here is my preliminary theory: Three factors which produce vital qi of mountain ranges are currents of underground water, currents of wind, and mountains that contain minerals that in turn produce qi. Figure 18-2 indicates two directions of qi flow from mountain ranges. One (on the right) is from mountain ranges that spiral in a clockwise direction, and the other (on the left) is from mountain ranges that spiral counterclockwise. The ranges look like dragons lying in a coil around the spot "Bright Hall." Rainwater that flows along the ranges forms veins of water underground that converge at the end to form rivers. I explained before that qi spirals clockwise. Figure 18-2 shows what I interpret as the vital energy of the ranges flowing in a way that is similar to the law of the right-handed screw from electromagnetism. In effect, the counterclockwise ranges let the qi of the earth gush out through the spot "Bright Hall," while the clockwise mountain ranges make cosmic qi flow over that same spot. Thus, I suppose that this spot turns into a very positive place.

Continue reading here: Judging Qi Direction

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