Swimming Dragon Qigong Images

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Fig 6 Fig 7

Look at the Big Dipper i. After you have finished holding the back of your legs, lift up both hands to the sides, breathe in and lift up all your toes. Put your hands on the Futu points. Fig 6-9

ii. Close both hands. Then put the right Laogong point on the Guanyuan point and the left hand should grab the shoulder, so the Laogong point touches it. Meanwhile, breathe out and the toes should grab the ground. Turn the head to the left as if you are looking at the Big Dipper in the sky. Fig 10

iii. Then bring both hands back to the Dantian, the left Laogong point should cover the right Laogong point. Meanwhile breathe out and relax your toes, Fig 11.

iv. Lift up both hands from the Dantian, and then open them to the sides. Breathe in and lift up your toes. Fig 12

v. Bring both hands back to the Futu points so the Laogong points connect with them. Then gently rub the Futu points.

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Dantian Therapy Shen Heart Jing

Fig 12

Developing Dantian Images

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Fig 10

Swimming Dragon Qigong Images

Fig 11

"It is good for any problems which relate to the breathing, lungs and upper body"

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Throughout history, Taoists have propagated the development and restoration of the human body, breath, and spirit. They called these the Three Treasures (Sanpao)—Jing, Qi, and Shen. The human body results from the culmination of sexual forces, or Jing, is animated by the vital force of Qi, and made conscious through the activation of Shen. Jing, then, is akin to your body, Qi to your breath, and Shen to your mind.

Arts of Nourishing Life

By preserving the three treasures, Taoists believe that people can achieve optimum health and longevity and also create within themselves the alchemical gate to immortality.

Three practices dominate the Taoist quest for health, longevity, and immortality: one, the ingestion of herbal medicines (Fu Erh) and purification dietary regimes; two, the performance of physical and respiratory exercises (Tunna) to gain breath control and mobilize the Qi; and three, the achievement of mental and physical tranquility through meditation (Ching Tso). If one or more of these three practices can be maintained in your daily life, you would at the very least restore your vitality and stamina (having youthfulness in old age). Depending on the depth and sincerity of your efforts, you could attain longevity (living to over one hundred years of age in good health), oryou could actually discover the internal elixir of immortality.

Cell Membrane Outter Surface

Many Taoists considered longevity (Shou) as the ability to attain youthfulness within old age and to live healthy to the end of their days. Sickness prevents cultivators from putting all their effort toward immortality, and death ensures failure. The notion of living beyond one hundred years of age has always been considered a milepost of sorts, proving to everyone that your art and teaching had merit.

In order to preserve the three treasures and forge the internal elixir of immortality, Taoists developed physical and respiratory exercises—originally placed under the general heading of Yang Sheng Shu (arts of nourishing life). The entire basis for what is now popularly called "Qigong" began with the simple experiment of healing with the breath, which in turn leads to the discovery of Qi energy itself. Through simply breathing in deeply and then focusing the exhalation, along with imaginary vision of the breath expelling out through the location of the pain or affliction, the early Chinese discovered not only a great healing power, but an internal energy as well. Later terms included T'u Na (to spit out and take in), Xing Qi (moving the breath-energy), Pi Qi (closing the breath), Dao Yin (leading and enticing), Yun Qi (circulating Qi), Xiaozhoutian (lesser heavenly circuit), and what is now generically referred to as Qigong (exercising the breath-energy—Qigong).

Within Yang Sheng, the respiratory techniques for increasing both health and longevity were called T'u Na (literally "to spit out and to take in") and Hsing Qi (to move the breath/ energy).

The terms Tunn a and Daoyin first appeared in chapter fifteen of Chuang Tzu (circa 369-286 b.c.), where it says:

"Breathing in and out in various manners, spitting out the old and taking in the new, walking like a bear and stretching their necks like a bird to achieve longevity. This is what such practitioners of Daoyin, cultivators of the body and all those searching for long-life like Ancestor Peng* enjoy."

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