The Greatacom Plishment Lineage I

The cover of The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine old were "still and unmoved." "Their breathing came deep and silent" and their "minds were free from all disturbance," "forgetting everything." They were "open to everything and forgot all fear of death."

A disciple tells his master, "I am making progress." "What do you mean?" asks the master. "I sit and forget everything... becoming one with the great void in which there is no obstruction."

In the 1st century CE, exercises for the cultivation of internal energy (Chi) were developed as part of Taoism and included the practice of remaining completely still in fixed positions. Emphasis was then placed on using the mind to control the movement of internal energy within the body and then to project it outwards.

Buddhist thought and practice also had an influence on the development of the tradition. When the Buddhist practice of " one-pointedness" of mind (the ability to focus the mind clearly) was incorporated into Chi Kung training, mental concentration could be used to help cultivate Chi energy throughout the body and direct its movement.

From the 12th century CE onwards this understanding of energy and the intimate body/mind relationship was employed in the progressive deepening of the internal martial arts.

A martial arts academy in 1911 is presided over by Master Guo Yun Sin (seated in white), under whom Wang Xiang Zhai studied. 43

PART TWO

Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Heal Yourself With Qi Gong

Qigong also spelled Ch'i Kung is a potent system of healing and energy medicine from China. It's the art and science of utilizing breathing methods, gentle movement, and meditation to clean, fortify, and circulate the life energy qi.

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